Merano / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Very happy to know that Merano Residences was shortlisted by the RIBA as part of the 83 Best New Buildings in London. Although it was not the best period of the year to photograph, the results came out quite well. I will be back next summer to make the best out of it. Wishing RSH+P luck!

“Since 1996, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has hosted awards for exemplary buildings across the UK by RIBA Chartered Architects and RIBA International Fellows. This year, 83 projects have been shortlisted for the RIBA London Awards from a list of 200 entrants.

Each project will be visited by one of five London juries during the month of April. Winners will be announced at the award ceremony on May 20th at the RIBA headquarters at 66 Portland Place, London. News of the shortlist follows on from similar selections by RIBA South WestRIBA East, and RIBA North East.” (https://www.archdaily.com/913299/the-83-best-new-buildings-in-london-shortlisted-by-the-riba)






Riverlight by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Riverlight will transform a triangular, five-acre industrial estate – close to Battersea Power Station on the south bank of the River Thames – into a residential-led mixed use development, creating a transition between the large footprints of the power station and the smaller residential developments to the east.

The scheme includes 806 homes, underground parking, crèche, restaurants, bars, a food store and other retail spaces. It incorporates a river walk and landscaping to take full advantage of its location and create attractive public spaces for the local community. The development will be delivered via six buildings, arranged in a rising-form composition, ranging in height from 12 to 20 storeys and giving the development a varied skyline. Around 60 per cent of the scheme will be designated as public open space.

The architectural expression takes its cue from the former industrial warehouse buildings that lined the river. The language is of simple robust structures which emphasise their construction. Buildings are divided into three distinct zones: top, middle, and base. Top levels are lightweight, two-storey structures with gull-wing roofs; mid levels are represented as concrete floors expressed every two storeys, with intermediate floors expressed as lightweight steel balconies.

In landscape terms, each area of the development is conceived as having its own distinct character. The newly created river walk – slightly raised to allow views over the river wall to the Thames – brings a 17m-wide boulevard to a previously underused part of the waterfront. Commercial and community uses at street level – including restaurants, bars and cafés arranged around the dock inlet, as well as a food store, crèche and business suite – will help to attract visitors onto the site and animate the public areas of the scheme.

http://www.rsh-p.com/projects/riverlight/

 St James Riverlight by Joas Souza Photographer