Riverlight by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Riverlight will transform a triangular, five-acre industrial estate – close to Battersea Power Station on the south bank of the River Thames – into a residential-led mixed use development, creating a transition between the large footprints of the power station and the smaller residential developments to the east.

The scheme includes 806 homes, underground parking, crèche, restaurants, bars, a food store and other retail spaces. It incorporates a river walk and landscaping to take full advantage of its location and create attractive public spaces for the local community. The development will be delivered via six buildings, arranged in a rising-form composition, ranging in height from 12 to 20 storeys and giving the development a varied skyline. Around 60 per cent of the scheme will be designated as public open space.

The architectural expression takes its cue from the former industrial warehouse buildings that lined the river. The language is of simple robust structures which emphasise their construction. Buildings are divided into three distinct zones: top, middle, and base. Top levels are lightweight, two-storey structures with gull-wing roofs; mid levels are represented as concrete floors expressed every two storeys, with intermediate floors expressed as lightweight steel balconies.

In landscape terms, each area of the development is conceived as having its own distinct character. The newly created river walk – slightly raised to allow views over the river wall to the Thames – brings a 17m-wide boulevard to a previously underused part of the waterfront. Commercial and community uses at street level – including restaurants, bars and cafés arranged around the dock inlet, as well as a food store, crèche and business suite – will help to attract visitors onto the site and animate the public areas of the scheme.

http://www.rsh-p.com/projects/riverlight/

 St James Riverlight by Joas Souza Photographer

Brent Civic Centre by Hopkins Architects

"Located on a prominent site next to two well-known civic icons, Wembley Stadium and Wembley Arena, the new Civic Centre streamlines all aspects of the Council's activities and has become a new hub and heart for the community where residents can meet, shop and eat. It houses Brent's civic, public and administrative functions under one unified roof, providing office space for 2000 staff.

The building's spaces are arranged around a soaring, naturally-lit foyer and atrium which houses a large public amphitheatre and staircase that host a programme of high-quality arts and cultural experiences that further enhance the building. A circular Drum clad in timber fins features prominently in this space and houses a multi-purpose community hall, library, one-stop shop and civic chamber.

Behind this, glazed office wings are open-plan and flexible to provide a future-proofed solution to the diverse community's administrative needs. The building also includes space for retail outlets and a landscaped garden to help it to connect further with the surrounding Wembley Regeneration Area.

The project has been awarded the coveted BREEAM 'Outstanding' rating, the highest possible, and is the first project in its category to have achieved this. As such, it features a 33% reduction in carbon emissions thanks to a combination of solar shading, natural ventilation, high-performance façade, and combined cooling, heating and power which utilises waste fish oil. It is the most sustainable local authority building to be completed in the UK."

Font: http://www.hopkins.co.uk/projects/5/145/

The Shed at the National Theather by Haworth Tompkins

I was passing by, on my way to a job in South Bank when I spotted a nice angle of The Shed, recently build, a bright red auditorium amongst the brutalist concrete of London's National Theatre. Need to come back to get it from all angles that I already have on my mind. 

New Aerial Photographs of Salvador - Bahia - Brazil

I just came back from a long holiday in Brazil after 5 years without stepping foot on my homeland. Once there, I had the opportunity to once again, fly over the City of Salvador, capital of the state of  Bahia and photograph the changes that happened since my last visit in 2010. The city still absolutely beautiful. As almost everywhere on the planet, the true beauty of place can just be fully contemplated from above, and the City of Salvador is not an exception. For those how never had the chance to visit Brazil, here I can show you a bit of what you've been missing!  http://www.joasphotographer.com/aerial-photography-brazil/

Foundation Louis Vuitton by Frank Owen Gehry

The Foundation Louis Vuitton is no doubt, one of the most espetacular buildings ever, a masterpiece designed by the architect Frank Owen Gehry, which for me, is one of the best and most important architects alive. During my last visit to Paris to photograph the La Defense district, I spared couple of hours to get closer to this place and grab some shots. Here they are...

Parque Empresarial Las Mercedes Madrid

Commissioned by Creative Works London for CBRE and Standard Life Investments.

 44 pages investment brochure. Images by Joas Souza | Photographer

44 pages investment brochure. Images by Joas Souza | Photographer

New WEB Domain set!

From now on, my portfolio can be seen using not only my usual web address joasphotographer.com, but using www.architecturalphotography.london also! Easier!

Two new lenses in the bag!

To be updated nowadays is a hard work, every day a better gear is available, and I can't stay behind. Today I got two of the newest lens from Canon, the EF 11-24mm f/4L USM ultra wide-angle zoom lens, with the widest angle of view (126º05’ diagonal) ever achieved for a rectilinear full-frame Digital SLR lens and the new Canon 16-35mm f4L ultra wide-angle zoom lens features newly developed, high quality Canon optics that incorporate three GMo (Glass-Molded) aspheric lens elements, including a large-diameter aspheric lens, which help improve image quality by correcting aberrations.

Barbican Architecture | Coming up soon.

Brutalism is an architectural movement that has always fascinated me, especially once I moved to the UK where I had the opportunity to personally contemplate a variety of buildings resulting from this movement. I have always had a strong desire to photograph “béton brut” projects, given the monochrome colours and the prolific use of geometric shapes. Unfortunately, there is almost no demand from my typical client base of architects and property investors for photographs of such projects. In fact, many of the projects have already been earmarked to be demolished to make space for modern architecture. Given these facts, I decided to hurry and turn this desire to portray this architectural movement into a personal project.

I chose two great iconic projects of Brutalist architecture in London, the Barbican Estate by Chamberlin, Powell and Bon and the Balfron Tower + Carradale House complex by Ernő Goldfinger. When portraying the Barbican, my eye searched for the details, the structure, rather than attempting to photograph the estate as a whole. The absence of colour sharpens my eyes to capture even more, the design, the texture of the raw concrete, the graphism created by not only by the design itself but for the curious shadows that such design creates once it is reached by the sun light, changing the landscape at all times. My first series, about the Barbican Estate, was completed recently. Here you can see a selection of 40 carefully selected images that illustrate, in all its splendour, the most beautiful part of this movement. My Balfron Tower + Carradale House photo series is underway and will be completed very soon.

 Barbican Estate by Architectural Photographer Joas Souza